A bar shows off a technique for blocking drink spikes, sparking debate

A bar in the UK has gone viral with a video demonstrating its technique to prevent the consumption of drinks, triggering a series of emotional reactions.

PJ’s, a bar and nightclub in Warrington, England, has amassed 8.6 million views on a TikTok video showing how its bartenders have helped protect their clientele. In the clip shared on Saturday, a bartender pulled out a bottle of beer next to a jar of plastic bottle caps. She inserted a cork into the bottle and stuck a straw through its sealed opening.

“Stay safe in your pajamas,” reads an overlay to the footage. “Ask your bartender for tumbler and bottle caps.”

In the comments section, the bar added that the corks were provided for free.

A bar in the UK has gone viral with a video demonstrating its technique to prevent the consumption of drinks, triggering a series of emotional reactions. Here bar staff serve drinks at the Duke of Kent pub in London, UK in 2021.
Chris J Ratcliffe/Stringer/Getty Images Europe

Last October, women across the UK organized a boycott of nightclubs and bars to protest against an increase in the consumption of drink and drugs through needle injections. Between early September and early December 2021, the National Police Chiefs Council (NPCC) recorded 670 reports of injection spikes across the country.

According to a survey by British research firm YouGov in November 2021, one in nine British women said they had experienced a spike in alcohol. Another 8% said a family member had been doped and 12% said a friend had been doped. A third of the total number of women questioned had themselves been drugged or knew someone who had been.

Beneath the clip posted by PJ’s, the comments ranged in emotion from gratitude, skepticism and gloom.

“These should be in every pub and club in the world,” said one viewer.

But scattered among those who cheered the bar, some viewers suggested the measure was insufficient.

“If you were to get doped, couldn’t you just pour the powder or whatever down the straw?” asked a skeptic.

“I worked as a bar security guard for almost a decade,” another added. “It’s very rare to spoil a drink you’ve already had. It’s when someone brings you a drink…it’s also almost always someone you already know who does it.”

Another cynic suggested the method only worked when bartenders could be trusted. “Until you realize it’s the bartenders who climb,” their comment read.

Despite this debate, most viewers agreed that it was disappointing to live in a world where PJ’s efforts were necessary.

“It’s so sad this is what we have to do now, stay safe everyone,” one comment summed up the downcast mood.

Newsweek contacted PJ for comment.


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